en.toflyintheworld.com
New recipes

How to Throw a Record-Breaking Grammys Party

How to Throw a Record-Breaking Grammys Party


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Turn the volume up, tune in, and throw a great Grammys bash with these tips

Have the best time ever watching the Grammys with these party tips.

This Sunday (Feb. But just because you’re tuning in on TV doesn’t mean you can’t throw an award-worthy party yourself.

For the How to Throw a Record-Breaking Grammys Party Slideshow, click here.

All you really need for a killer Grammys party are friends, food, plenty of cocktails, and a TV. The theme is already covered: You’re throwing a Grammys party. Thus, you need to dress like a pop star, get your photo taken on the “red carpet” and sit among gold records and music notes.

For 2017, the Grammys will also be serving up some Lemonade, courtesy of Beyoncé, who is nominated for nine awards and heavily rumored to be performing. So, when the Grammys give you Bey, you serve lemonade and play drinking games to go along with it.


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


How to break a Guinness World Record

The tallest, the shortest, the fattest, the most spoons . who doesn’t want to be the best in the world?

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

What the fork? . Etibar Elchiyev attempts the record for ‘most spoons on a human body’ in 2011. Photograph: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Last modified on Sat 12 Sep 2015 00.01 BST

W hy are we so fascinated by breaking records? For record holders, it is official confirmation you can do something better than anyone else in the world, even if it is just eating a lemon. People like setting goals, pushing themselves – especially if they get to see their name in print at the end of it.

Although humans have been competing and showing off for thousands of years, the official arbiter of human achievement, Guinness World Records, is still young. It all began 64 years ago when Sir Hugh Beaver, head of Guinness brewery, got into an argument at a shooting party about the fastest game bird in Europe: was it the grouse, the teal or the plover? Before Wikipedia, there was no easy way of checking – even his host’s well-stocked library couldn’t settle the matter. And so the idea for a book of records was born, a definitive list of the world’s superlatives.

Who is a typical record-breaker?

GWR gets about 1,000 record claims a week, of which 5%-7% are accepted, and about 2% make it into the annual book. Applications come from all over the world: most from the US, followed by India and China – two Indian men are currently battling for the longest ear hair record. The typical would-be record-breaker is a man in his mid-30s.

There is also a core of serial record-breakers. Ashrita Furman from the US has the record for holding the most records (more than 200, though he has broken up to 600). Some people make record attempts every day some have a GWR logo tattoo some even change their name to Guinness.

What record should I break?

Almost anything definable, measurable and provable can become a record. They change with the times: records involving selfies and twerking have been popular recently. Some are easy to attempt but difficult to beat, such as eating three cream crackers in the fastest time (34.78 secs). It’s easier to beat an existing record than set a new one “firsts” have to be approved.

You should apply to GWR before making the record attempt it will send you the general guidelines and those specific to your record. The general notes spell out the importance of evidence: photographic, video, independent witnesses – as much as you can get. For mass-participation records, you must prove that you’ve counted properly.

How can I actually break the record?

Analyse your specific rules to spot and exploit any loopholes. For example, Furman smashed the world record for rolling an orange for a mile with his nose when he discovered the rules didn’t stipulate colour – he chose an unripe green orange from Florida that was hard, round and fast.

A record doesn’t have to conform to the world’s view of what is worthy or important. Are Olympic sports such as synchronised swimming really of any more value than underwater skipping (current world record holder, Peter Nestler)? Choose something you’re good at.

What is a fast track to failure?

It isn’t enough to just be able to do something unusual, such as lick your elbow. You need to be able to lick your elbow for the most times in an hour – something that can then be attempted and broken by someone else. It can’t be too niche – oldest heart-transplant patient to mud-wrestle, for example.

Records will be dismissed if they are considered stupid, dangerous or illegal, or if there isn’t enough evidence: an organist’s playing marathon was rejected because it was only witnessed by her parents. (She complained to the Queen, to no avail.)

It should go without saying, but avoid anything that is cruel to animals – heaviest pet records have been dropped because of force-feeding, though you can still overfeed yourself. In fact, there is now a vacancy for heaviest man, as he died recently. And don’t cheat! One man, who broke the record for the most pint glasses balanced on his chin, was stripped of his accolade when he admitted to using plastic cups.

Dedication’s what you need . record-breaking record breaker Ashrita Furman walked 11.3 km (7 miles) balancing a billiard cue on the tip of his finger. Photograph: Aladin Abdel Naby/Reuters


Watch the video: LIVE: GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony. March 14 at 3pm ET. 12pm PT


Comments:

  1. Kerwin

    Cool! Smiled! Aftar - respect!

  2. Lew

    Many thanks for the information.

  3. Iccauhtli

    You must tell him that you are not right.

  4. Jabin

    Congratulations, a very good idea

  5. Roan

    your phrase is very good

  6. Stanhop

    I'm sorry, but I think you are making a mistake. Email me at PM.



Write a message