en.toflyintheworld.com
New recipes

Our Favorite Hollywood Dinner Party Moments

Our Favorite Hollywood Dinner Party Moments


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Entertaining tips from the silver screen

When it comes to entertaining guests, no one does it better than Hollywood. From lavish parties with dancing under the stars like we see in Sabrina, to boisterous dinners for 20 in your living room like the one in The Party, there is always something to take away from these silver-screen classics. Hosting a dinner party this weekend? Just take note of what Millicent does in Dinner for Eight, and don’t do that at home.

Dinner at Eight (1933)

What to do (and not to do) when you’re short a couple when planning a dinner party.

The Party (1968)

Many a host or hostess' worst nightmare, from playing musical chairs to salads spilled on the floor.

Beetlejuice (1998)

When you’re looking for a way to jazz up your next dinner party, take note of how the Deetz’s make their dinner parties unforgettable.

The Dinner Game (Le Dîner de cons, 1998)

Tired of the same old weekly dinner party routine? Do as Pierre and friends do at their weekly gatherings and invite the dumbest person you can find each week to keep things entertaining. (This is the original screenplay from which Dinner for Schmucks was adapted.)

Big Night (1996)

A look at what really goes on behind the scenes when you’re entertaining friends in a restaurant.

Alice Adams (1935)

Katharine Hepburn shows us what not to say and discuss when looking to impress your next dinner guest.

Sabrina (1995)

Tips on how to woo a lady in the world of lavish dinner parties and formal meals, courtesy of the high-rolling Larrabee brothers.

Like what you saw? Click here to see Our Favorite Dinner Party Moments on Television.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


We’ve all been there: tired and hangry and wishing dinner would spontaneously appear. You want something now and it must be decidedly delicious. Pasta is a good bet, but even with the official pasta sauce power rankings for reference, plain jarred tomato sauce doesn’t always cut it. Not to worry. Here are 11 recipes that use 11 or fewer ingredients and can be made, start to finish in about the time it takes to get the pasta cooked (30 minutes or less).

At moments like these, my go-to is a big bowl of spaghetti aglio e olio, that classic Italian no-sauce-sauce of garlic-infused olive oil and crushed chile peppers (and, for me, lots of ground black pepper). The aroma is intoxicating the flavor, intense. You’ll want more, long after it is all gone. And it is so easy, you’ll even have time to toss together a salad to go with.

The garlic-olive oil combo serves as a base for many equally or almost as simple and delectable preparations, the operative words being simple and delectable. Fava beans add some protein in a riff on scampi (the splash of lemon makes the flavors really pop). Nutrient-rich, budget-friendly canned sardines give pasta chi sardi a mari a unique depth of flavor, and toasted breadcrumbs augment the texture of the dish. The capers in midnight pasta add some brininess to the party, which is balanced with the sweet buttery-ness of pine nuts.

Orecchiette with broccoli rabe and garlic bread crumbs adds a few more layers of textures, as well as flavor, and you get to check off “eating your vegetables” from your daily To Eat list. Pasta with Italian sausage and broccoli brings new zest and yet another vegetable to the plate, and the spicy sausage amps up the dish’s already-high flavor factor.

Too much garlic? (Admittedly, I can’t really make sense of that phrase, though I know that for some it is meaningful.) The green garlic in whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg bears a gentler, more subtle garlickiness than that from mature bulbs. The tender stalks intertwine with the spaghetti strands, which, when coated with egg yolk and garlic oil, is utterly dope.

Still too much garlic? It is completely optional in tomato-y pasta all’ Amatriciana, and neither the ever-popular cacio e pepe nor the spaghetti carbonara even hints at including garlic.

If that jar of marinara sitting in your pantry keeps calling your name, you can use it for one-pan pasta and doctor it up with additional ingredients. Sort of like making lasagna with those no-boil lasagna sheets, the angel hair cooks in and soaks up the sauce, making the pasta extra flavorful. Even better: There is no separate pasta pot to wash.


Watch the video: Δύο Έλληνες ηθοποιοί που αυτοκτόνησαν πριν φτάσουν 50 ετών!


Comments:

  1. Dashura

    remarkably, this is the precious coin

  2. Heikki

    Flat customer nothing.

  3. Uptun

    can not be

  4. Abu Bakr

    Does not approve

  5. Caius

    Delicious



Write a message